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Snakes are more frequent due to rainy weather

27 May 2021

Cyclists and runners may encounter more snakes this season due to rainy conditions in the area. Snakes seek ground that is higher and dryer. Not only this involves the trails, but it could also be your doorstep. South Texas is home to poisonous rattlesnakes, copperheads, moccasins/cottonmouths, and coral snakes. The copperheads are common among the creeks that run along the greenway trails.

The trails are popular for folks who take their dogs along. When these pets want to relieve themselves, try to have it done in open areas where snakes can be seen. Otherwise, snakes can hide in high grass and weeds. Some are camouflaged—hard to see.

How can one tell if it's poisonous?

Before answering the question, it is always best to maintain vigilance and avoid contact with any snake. If you are bitten, seek medical help immediately! The greenway trails are accessible by medics; always know your whereabouts and dial 911. Try to identify the snake if at all possible.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), poisonous snakes have triangular-shaped heads. Nevertheless, never assume that a snake is poisonous or not; the best bet is to avoid them altogether.

Big Four Gallery

Rattlesnake has a rattler on its tail—Photo: Sean P. Bush, CDC
Rattlesnake has a rattler on its tail—Photo: Sean P. Bush, CDC

Copperhead snake -  light-colored with red and brown crossbands—Photo: Sean P. Bush, CDC
Copperhead snake - light-colored with red and brown crossbands—Photo: Sean P. Bush, CDC

Water moccasins with dark brown, olive green and even solid black colors—Photo: Sean P. Bush and Frederick S. Boyce, CDC
Water moccasins with dark brown, olive green and even solid black colors—Photo: Sean P. Bush and Frederick S. Boyce, CDC

Coralsnake with red, yellow, and black bands—Photo: Mike Cardwell and Elda Sanchez, CDC
Coralsnake with red, yellow, and black bands—Photo: Mike Cardwell and Elda Sanchez, CDC

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